Friday, 7 April 2017

Let the data tell the story





Maths creditsTotal NCEA creditsTeacher reflection
733
Year 11 students at my school lost NINE timetabled maths lessons in term 1 due to school activities like:

Powhiri practice - 1 period
Powhiri - 1 period
Athletics Day - 2 periods
Teacher only day - 2 periods and
Student Achievement Conferences - 3 periods.

One of the ways to make up for lost TIME would be for students to return to school during the Easter break, do some revision and then sit missed assessments............................. Who was I kidding??

I had to come up with a more believable plan, so I turned to my trusted friend.......DATA.

Term 1 credit protocol at our college is for each learner to get a minimum of 4 credits per subject so that they could end the term on a total of at least 20 NCEA credits. The table on the left, shows our NCEA L1 Maori learners' data, 3 weeks before end of term 1. The credits highlighted in green are my year 11 Maori learners and if you look closely enough you will see that one (11%) of my learners has met term 1 credit protocol compared to nine (20%) school-wide......... I read a Momentum Quote a few days ago which said "if they can do it, so can you", so I shared this data and the quote with my learners today and it encouraged them to reflect on what we can do differently. With 4 days left to go this term, we hope that sharing the data will get us the desired outcome.











329
427
427
426
025
423
421
021
019
417
417
416
416
414
412
412
412
012
411
410
010
49
48
08
47
46
06
05
05
04
04
04
03
03
03
02
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Saturday, 1 April 2017

Momentum quote - Most people quit...

"Most people quit because they look how far they have to go, not how far they have come" - Anon.

Just reflecting on how my NCEA L1 Maori learners are progressing, as we near the end of term 1. Our NCEA L1 Algebra assessment, worth 3 credits, was postponed from Tuesday to Friday as learners did not feel confident enough on the day.

On the Friday 6 students (60%) were absent, 3 students (30%) did not sit (DNS) as they felt that they needed to build more confidence and 1 student (10%) sat the assessment. A comparison of data is shown in the table below.
  
AS 91029
Internal
3 credits
% Maori 1104MAT - 2017
% Maori 1104MAT - 2016
Maori National Decile Equivalent (%) - 2016
N
90% - DNS
33% - DNS
17.8%
A
10%
50%
62.2%
M
0%
17%
14.7%
E
0%
0%
5.3%

A final extension will be given in the last week of term which is 2 weeks away. Fingers crossed, we hope to reduce the number of students with DNS (did not sit).

Friday, 17 March 2017

Data

"90% of data ever created was created in the last 2 years"? (Science Daily, 22 May 2013)

What are we doing with all the rich data that confronts us almost on a daily basis? Well, most of us like to create tables and graphs and play around with fonts, colours and backgrounds and if we bump into a colleague or two who seem a tad bit interested, we enthusiastically share our analyses and wonderings. In fact, we become so obsessed with data that we even do an Inquiry about it.

I am guilty of over-analysing data and sharing with EVERYONE except my learners, so my commitment is to:
- share data with my learners so that their learning can be supported
- personalise progress so that learners and their whanau can easily access and track
- use data to inform my practice.

Friday, 10 March 2017

Pre Test confidence review

A review of "breaking down the walls that are preventing us from working to our potential" shows that of my ten Maori learners, only five (50%) completed the survey; four (40%) were absent and one (10%) did not have access to a device on the day. Survey questions and responses were:

Question: With our L1 assessment a few days away, how much effort have you put into your learning?
Responses ranged from none to Excellence

Question: What can your teacher do differently, to assist you in becoming successful?

Responses: 
- idk
- nothing
- nothing shes doing good
- talk less and give us more time to do our work


Question: What can your whanau do differently, to assist you in becoming successful?

Responses:
- let me listen to music 
- do nothing
- offer more support
- they could help me by keeping the wifi on at night so I can do late night studies
- leave the internet on

Question: What can your friends do differently, to assist you in becoming successful?

Responses:
- nothing
- nothing, no-one distracts me
- stop talking
- stop talking
- help and do not distract each other

Question: What can you do differently, to maximise your learning?

Responses:
- idk
- stay focused
- do work
- focus more
- sit in the front of the class

Question: What support or encouragement has your teacher given you for this standard?

Responses:
- she says that she doesn't want the people who just has achieve
- good
- moral support
- work hard
- Shes so positive and supports us better then most teachers.

Unfortunately, none of my Maori learners provided sufficient evidence for our Bivariate Statistics standard or completed the practice test in time, so we discussed these review results, postponed our test date and moved onto our next standard. 

Saturday, 4 March 2017

Momentum Quote - Walls

"You are confined only by the walls you build yourself" - Andrew Murphy.

Thirty one of my year 11 students, of whom ten are Maori have their first NCEA L1 mathematics assessment at the end of this week. In order to reach our school target of 80% getting L1 numeracy, we need at least twenty-four students including eight Maori to gain credits. We are way off the mark, so will discuss how to break down the walls that are preventing us from achieving to our potential. Students were asked to complete a student-voice survey. Look out for my next blog for the results.



Thursday, 2 March 2017

Momentum Quote - The world is moving so fast.....

"The world is moving so fast that the man who says it can't be done is generally interrupted by someone doing it" - Elbert Hubbard.

I am looking at our Maori L1 numeracy data from the previous year (50%) and am wondering how we are going to meet this year's target of 80%.  While I ponder this thought, I know that some brave soul out there is already doing something about it. Please feel free to share.................
I know that I need to hand over more RESPONSIBILITY (one of our school Values) to my learners and enter into explicit and deliberate discussions with each of them about their expectations for the year and then see how best, we as a school and me as their teacher can best support them "manage self" in order to surpass the school's goal of 80% achievement in L1 numeracy Maori learners.

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Effective pedagogy

'The primary purpose of assessment is to improve students’ learning and teachers’ teaching as both student and teacher respond to the information that it provides (NZC p.39) +Lenva Shearing 


Community of Practice

We all belong to a community; be it a family community, church community or a school community. As educators, however, we are privileged to be part of a COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE (CoP) where our passion for teaching and learning has a shared vision. The shared vision for our CoP includes SOLO Taxonomy, Class Task Sheets, Google Calendars and Blogging. All four are going to address our goal to make teaching and learning visible (Google Calendar and Class task Sheets), give learners a voice to address an authentic audience (Blogging) and to create pedagogical SHIFT to accelerate learning (SOLO).

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Accelerating L1 Maori achievement



Data data everywhere…...but does it lead to active analysis or analysis paralysis? My professional inquiry is about collecting and analysing NCEA L1 data to inform my teaching practice so that there is a shift in academic achievement of Maori Learners to meet our 2017 school target of 80% achieving NCEA L1 Numeracy. 50% of our Maori Learners achieved L1 Numeracy the previous year compared to our national decile equivalent of 68.7%

Bivariate Statistics
Profiling: understanding patterns of student achievement and other valued learning outcomes in detail
Image result for group of learners
The use of  year 10 data from Progressive Achievement Tests (PATs), the previous year were used as a guide to learners’ prior achievement in mathematics where the scale score was 55.9; 9.5 points below the national norm of 65.4.

Maori NCEA L1 Bivariate Statistics data from the previous year were used as a benchmark and is shown in the table below:

Grade
% Maori 1104MAT
% Maori My School
(2016)
Maori National Decile equivalent (2016)
N
60% - DNS
46.7%
18.5%
A
0%
6.7%
60.3%
M
0%
33.3%
16.8%
E
40%
13.3%
4.4%


Learners set themselves a goal as to what grade they hoped to achieve for the Bivariate standard; that was to give them something to work towards. A range of grades from Achieved to Excellence was selected. A few, however, did not select a grade.
Hypothesis generation and testing: identifying and systematically testing possible explanations for the problem
Lack of subject-specific vocabulary
Lack of success in the subject
Lack of knowledge about achievement criteria for success
Lack of responsibility for learning
Lack of "managing self" skills
Redesigning practice: Using research evidence to design refined and highly tailored responses to issues identified in the profiling
The two literacy strategies (word definition and mnemonic) were used constantly and consistently and were the norm for learning activities each day.
PPDAC represents:
Problem
Plan
Data
Analysis
Conclusion/comments

Word definitions included:
variables, bivariate, statistics, data, interpolate, extrapolate and outlier.

Feedback given to learners was based on their effort and how confidently they used the PPDAC cycle for each activity
Implementation
Learners had to create a Bivariate Statistics Google sheet to evidence five weeks of learning. Sheet 1 showed the achievement criteria for the standard and learners had to rename that sheet with the grade that they were going to work towards eg Achieved, Merit or Excellence and hopefully gain that grade for the summative assessment.

Learners had to “self-manage” their learning by tracking their progress on the Bivariate Class Task sheet and follow the Statistics Bivariate Daily Planner. Feedback for all work was consistent with the achievement criteria for the standard and was in the form of Achieved, Merit or Excellence.

Conferencing was done with groups or with individuals when learners felt that they needed additional support.
Evaluation & Re-redesign
To be completed after Student voice is collected next week, prior to learners sitting their first NCEA L1 summative assessment task.

Learners will take more ownership of their learning by
Setting an achievable goal
Stating the action that needs to follow
Finding a buddy to hold them accountable




Thursday, 23 February 2017

RISE values in action

On the first day of term, I set myself a goal to learn each students' name, in each of my classes...........wait for it........by the end of that period.

I had a strategy.

After initial welcomes and introductions, Student 1 told me their name, I shook their hand and repeated the name out aloud. I did the same to student 2, but before moving on,  I repeated names 1 and 2. Student 3 said their name, I shook their hand, repeated it loudly and then recalled names 1, 2 and 3 etc until I had been around the entire class. With my foreign accent, I struggled with a few pronunciations and students' initial reactions were to laugh at my effort.

That is a no no in our learning environment and was the perfect opportunity for us to discuss our school value RESPECT.

The RESPECT discussion was well worth it and students soon replaced laughter with words of encouragement.  +Brenton Moyes  +Venini Thaver

Thursday, 9 February 2017

Farewell

To all you non-bloggers out there, I bid you a sad farewell as I have decided to take the plunge into the blogging pool. After much encouragement and support from Manaiakalani colleagues, I have decided to be brave and give it a go. Watch this space! +Russel Dunn +Hinerau Anderson +Dorothy Apelu +Georgia Dougherty +Brenton Moyes +Karen Ferguson

Lesson Sequence








Number
Fractions: addition and subtraction

Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Experiential
Differentiation
Teacher conferenced with various groups using student knowledge as a guide and answered all questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively so that they can do critical thinking and show creativity as they learn (4 C’s for today’s Learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 3: Use a range of additive and simple multiplicative strategies on fractions

Level 4: Understand equivalent fractions and addition and subtraction of fractions
Success criteria
Learners are successful if they can do basic addition and subtraction with fractions and simplify where necessary

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify
numerators and denominators
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with Number problems in context
I can explain and
organise my thinking to solve Number problems in
context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on
my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
Write down 4 numbers, each with 1 decimal place.
0.1   0.4   0.3   0.6

Add the first two decimals together
0.1 + 0.4    = 0.5

Now add the last two decimals together
0.3 + 0.6     = 0.9

Write down 2 numbers with 2 decimal places. The bigger decimal should be written first. Now subtract them.

0.42 - 0.30   = 0.12

Read all three answers to your neighbour (this is to reinforce a previous lesson on place value with decimals)

Write each of your Decimals above as Fractions and solve
1/10 + 4/10  = 5/10
3/10 + 6/10   = 9/10

42/100 - 30/100   121/00

What did you notice?
0.5 is the same as 5/10: we added the numerators, but kept the denominators the same
0.9 is the same as 9/10:  we added the numerators, but kept the denominators the same
0.12 is the same as 12/100 : we subtracted the numerators, but kept the denominators the same

Can we make a general rule when adding or subtracting fractions?
When fractions have the same denominator, we do 2 things: Firstly we add or subtract the numerators and secondly, we keep the denominator the same (level 3)

So what do you think happens when the denominators are DIFFERENT?
Do you think we could change the rules and add the denominators?
Learners explore addition of fractions when denominators are not the same
Teacher’s example can be used if learners need assistance and cannot self manage

1/3   +    2/6

Learners can use these  resource 1  and resource 2 to help them understand equivalent fractions

Contextual Class challenge
Tau eats ⅕ of a whole fish and Tia eats two thirds. How much of the fish is left?
Teacher provocation
Pick out the WHITE hat (important information) - Tau eats ⅕ and Tia eats ⅔
So what do we need to find if we use this information? How much fish was eaten
What mathematical knowledge do we need in order to solve this? Addition of fractions when denominators are different.
What do we need to do to solve the contextual challenge? Find out how much fish was left
How do we do that? Subtract
What word in the challenge gives you a hint to subtract? The word left
Lesson sequence
Adding and subtracting basic Decimals (up to 2 decimal places)

Rewriting those Decimals as Fractions and solving

Comparing decimal answers with fraction answers

Exploring equivalent fractions

Inquiring into learning using online resources

Making learning visible by creating personalised notes by inserting images and explaining them and documenting evidence of learners’ understanding of basic addition and subtraction of fractions
Learning Experiences
Relating fractions to decimals
Exploring equivalent fractions
Developing and using strategies for adding and subtracting fractions
Resources
Google document
Teacher’s Google Number  site
Literacy strategy
Word definition: Learners define unfamiliar terms
Word
My definition
Online definition
equivalent
equal
equal in value or amount
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on personalised learners docs and their blogs
Learners blog their learning experience and comment on peers blogs
Next steps
Curriculum

Multiplication and division of fractions
Daily life
If you have a recipe for your favourite treat, but wish to make a smaller amount you will need to know how to reduce the quantities of all ingredients accordingly.
Reflection
The majority of the learners already knew how to add and subtract fractions with the same denominator, so they moved on to fractions with different denominators almost immediately


Resource attribution




Number
Fractions: Multiplication
and Division



Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Experiential
Differentiation
Teacher conferenced with various groups using learner knowledge as a guide and answered all
questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively
so that they can do critical thinking and show creativity as they learn (4 C’s for today’s
learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 4: Understand equivalent fractions
Level 5: Understand operations on fractions (Multiplication and Division)
Success criteria
Learners are successful if they can do basic multiplication and division of fractions and simplify where necessary

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify
numerators and denominators
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with fraction problems in context
I can explain and organise my thinking to solve fraction problems in context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
Solve by using numbers and mathematical symbols
half of ten        ½ x 10 = 5

one quarter of twelve     ¼ x 12 =3
one fifth of twenty        ⅕ x 20 = 4

Can you explain your thinking for each answer?
ten divided by two or 10/2 = 5
twelve divided by four or  12/4 = 3
twenty divided by five or 20/5 = 4

How can you write the number 12 as a fraction
Learners discuss or check online until they come up with a solution of
121
Explain three quarters of 12, but rewrite 12 as a fraction

3/4 x 12/1

3 x 12 divided by 4  x 1 = 36/4 = 9

Can we make a general rule when multiplying fractions?
Multiply the numerators to get the top part of the fraction then multiply the denominators to get the bottom part of the fraction

Learners who immediately simplify 36/4 as 9 explain to their neighbour as to why they simplified the fraction

Find a Google image that reinforces your knowledge of multiplying fractions and explain
your learning to your neighbour.

Image result for multiplying fractions
Teacher provocation
Reread your general rule for multiplying fractions.
Multiply the numerators to get the top part of the fraction then multiply the denominators to get the bottom part of the fraction
Using this knowledge, can we say that when dividing fractions we divide the numerators to get the top part of the fraction and divide the denominators to get the bottom part of the fraction?
Learners guess either yes or no and are given time to explore online for the rules when dividing
fractions before an example is discussed
When dividing fractions, we go to KFC Keep, Flip, Change
KEEP first fraction
FLIP the fraction to the right of the division sign
CHANGE division to multiplication
Then use your rule “Multiply the numerators to get the top part of the fraction then multiply the denominators to get the bottom part of the fraction”
Example
2/7  ÷   3/4 becomes
Image result for dividing fractions
Answer 2 x 4      =  8
            7 x 3         21

An additional challenge was done using 3 fractions to reinforce the learning that we Keep the first fraction, Flip the fractions to the right of the division sign and then Change division to multiplication
Contextual challenge (card resource)
Mrs Dunn is creating a cut-out resource made from special paper. She has ⅔ of a page left and needs ⅙ of a page for each resource. How many cut-out resources can she make?

⅔   ÷  ⅙

⅔  x 6

12/3

4 cut-outs
Lesson sequence
Solving fraction x whole number

Solving fraction x fraction

Creating a rule when multiplying fractions

Exploring division of fractions

Division in context

Making learning visible and documenting evidence of learners’ understanding of multiplication and division of fractions by creating personalised notes, inserting images and explaining them to peers
Learning Experiences
Relating fractions to decimals

Exploring equivalent fractions

Developing and using strategies for multiplication and division of fractions
Resources
Google document
Teacher’s Google Number  site
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on personalised learners docs and their blogs
Learners blog their learning experience and comment on peers blogs
Next steps
Curriculum

Fraction, Decimal, Percent conversion
Daily life

Maximising discounts advertised as fraction and/or
percent
Reflection
Remembering KFC (Keep, Flip, Change) when dividing fractions evoked
much enthusiasm and discussion amongst learners
















Number
Decimals



Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Experiential
Collaboration
Teacher conferenced with various groups using learners knowledge as a guide and answered all questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively so
that they could do critical thinking and show creativity as they learned (4 C’s for today’s Learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 3: Ordering decimals
Level 4: Decimals and place value to 3 places
Level 5: Recurring decimals (extension)
Success criteria:
Learners are successful if they can order decimals, read decimals correctly, compare decimals
and write decimals as percentages

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify Decimals
in daily life
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with Number problems in context
I can explain and organise my thinking to solve Number problems in context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
Rearrange these letters “a decimal point” to explain what a decimal is. Use each letter only once and use all letters.

Teacher reads the instruction aloud and answers any questions posed by learners

Learners work independently and/or collaboratively as they work towards a possible solution
I’m a dot in place
Lesson sequence
Rearrange given letters to better understand what a decimal point is

If I gave you $500 would you be happy?
Now along comes the decimal point and lands just after the number 5 to make $5.00, would you still be happy? Class discussion about the impact of the decimal point on the value of the money

Answer question 1 and 2 to determine learners’ curriculum level
Question 1. Four friends, Mele, Tui, Tevita and Anna can jump 3.1m, 3.15, 3.01 and 3.10m respectively. Arrange these distances in ascending order

Teacher comment: When rearranging or comparing, decimals, look at the first digit, of each number: if they are similar, then look at and compare the next digit eg in 3.15 and 3.01 (1/10 is greater than 0/10 or 15/100 is greater than 1/100), so 3.15 is greater than 3.01

Thinking/discussion: When comparing 3.1 and 3.10 both can be read as having 1/10, so the two decimals are equal.

Any zero after the decimal point that is not followed by another number is just a place-holder

Question 2. Draw a number line (any length) from 0 to 1. Mark the middle and give it a decimal value. Keep finding the middle until you reach 3 decimal places.

Use your learning outcomes table, from Mrs Dunn Maths site to determine the curriculum level for each Question (this is for learners to identify their learning needs)

Teacher provocations
How would you read this decimal 1.25?
one and twenty- five hundredths
one and two tenths and five hundredths
one point two five not one point twenty five - Learners work independently and/or collaboratively

Discuss how to read and compare decimals
Explore learning using online resources
Make learning visible by creating personalised notes documenting evidence of learners’ understanding of Decimals

Teacher provides opportunities for learners to develop and demonstrate their thinking by discussing with peers and documenting on a Google doc. Teacher expectation is that of learners’ managing their learning.
Learners self-manage by choosing the appropriate curriculum levels for the topic and can move on to the next level if they feel confident in their ability

Learners show evidence of their thinking and learning by creating personalised notes after navigating the hyperlinked Decimals resources on Mrs Dunn Maths site

All evidence of thinking/learning is visible on a Google document which is shared with the teacher and can also be shared with peers for commenting
Learning Experiences
Learners work independently and/or collaboratively. Writing decimals in words and symbols as learners often confuse decimals with money and read it incorrectly.

Learners work independently and/or collaboratively. Comparing decimals on number lines to see progressions from smallest to biggest

Learners work independently and/or collaboratively. Understanding decimals as percentages eg 0.25 is 25%
Resources
Smartboard or cut-outs of letters (so that learners can drag or rearrange letters)
Google document
Teacher’s Google Number  site
Literacy strategy
Word definition: Learners define unfamiliar terms
Word
My definition
Online definition
ascending
going up
go up or climb
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on personalised learners docs and their blogs
Learners blog their learning experience and comment on peers blogs
Next steps
Curriculum
Convert common Decimals up to 2 dp) to Fractions (L3) which will lead on to basic operations with fractions (L4,5 )
Daily life
Fractions are used in baking or cooking. Basic operations are used eg if ¼ cup of sugar, sometimes it is necessary to either double or halve the recipe.
Reflection
More emphasis needs to be placed on place value, particularly for numbers after the decimal point so that learners use words like tenths, hundredths and thousandths confidently. Using money as an example when learning about decimals is contradictory as $5.70 (five dollars seventy) is not read as five point seven zero dollars. There are no tens, hundreds and thousands after the decimal point; instead it is tenths, hundredths and thousandths




Number
Fraction, Decimal, Percent Conversion

Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Experiential
Differentiation
Teacher conferenced with various groups using learner knowledge as a guide and answered all questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively so that they can do critical thinking and show creativity as they learn (4 C’s for today’s learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 3: Know fractions and percentages in everyday use
Level 4: Know the equivalent decimal and percentage forms for everyday fractions.
Level 5: Know commonly used fraction, decimal, and percentage conversions
Success criteria
Learners are successful if they can convert commonly used Fraction, Decimal and Percent and can work out prices regardless of whether discounts are expressed as Fractions or Percentages

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify
Fractions, Decimals and Percent
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with Number problems in context
I can explain and organise my thinking to solve Number problems in context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
On weekends or after school, where do you see Fractions and/or Percent? Online activity
A few volunteers explain what they wrote on the lino board while the rest of the class listens attentively and respectfully
Lesson sequence
Question 1. Retailers express some of their discounts as Fractions and others as a Percent. Explain how to determine which discount will benefit you the most?
Briscoes is offering a 25% discount on a  $20 fan and The Warehouse is one third discount on a $30 fan.
Which retailer is offering you a better buy and how much change will you get if you pay with a $50 note.

Statement
Working
Answer
Briscoes discount
25% x $20
$5
Cost at Briscoes
$20 - $5
$15
Change at Briscoes
$50 - $15
$35
Warehouse discount
⅓ x $30
$10
Cost at Warehouse
$30 - $10
$20
Change (Warehouse)
$50 - $20
$30
⅓ is bigger than 25% (¼) so Better deal is at The Warehouse

Activity 1
*Screenshot a house on the internet that you would like to buy.
a) How much is the house?
b) Write this amount in words. (Level 3)
c) What will the deposit be? (Level 4)
d) How much will still be owing? (Level 3)
Real estate commission in Auckland ranges from 2.95 - 4% for the first $300 000 and then 2 - 2.5% thereafter. A base fee up to $500 is charged regardless of whether the house is sold or not. GST is also added.
e)How much commission would be made if you sold your house at the price mentioned in (a) (level 5)
Learning Experiences
Learners work independently and/or collaboratively by adding their contribution to the lino activity about where they see Fractions and/or Percent.

Learners work independently and/or collaboratively comparing fraction and percent

Learners work independently and/or collaboratively understanding and solving discount, deposit and commission questions

Talking about percentages in everyday contexts

Maximising discounts expressed as Fractions and/or Percent

Converting Fraction, Decimal, Percent

Encouraging creativity as learners explore and select an image of a house online

Using a calculator with confidence
Resources
Lino
Flyers
Junkmail
Online retail sites
Google document
Mrs Dunn maths Google site - Fraction, Decimal, Percent
Literacy strategy
Chunking - break information up into smaller pieces or chunks to facilitate understanding

Word definition
Word
My definition
Online definition
discount
less
deduction from the usual cost of something
percent
100
one part in every hundred
commission
don’t know
money paid upon completion of a task
retailer
not sure
business or person who sells goods to consumers
deposit
money that you put down
first instalment with the balance being paid later
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on personalised learners docs and their blogs
Learners blog their learning experience and comment on peers blogs
Next steps
Curriculum

Integers
Daily life

Daily temperatures
Credit and debt
Sea level (height above and below)
Reflection
Much enthusiasm was generated as learners compared their selected home with peers and some even ventured to homes in other countries - this will lead to exchange rates and ratio at a later stage






Number
Integers
Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Experiential
Differentiation
Teacher conferenced with various groups using student knowledge as a guide and answered all questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively so that they can do critical thinking and show creativity as they learn (4 C’s for today’s learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 4: Understand addition and subtraction of integers.
Know the relative size and place value structure of positive and negative
numbers

Level 5: Understand operations on integers
Success criteria
Learners are successful if they can understand the size and place value of integers and can understand operations on integers

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with Integer problems in context
I can explain and organise my thinking to solve Integer problems in context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
Google today’s temperature in Auckland.  
240C

Choose a country or city in the Northern hemisphere and write down their temperature. Use Google maps if you need help finding a city or country.
Russia, -20C. Discussion about why other countries are not as warm as Auckland.

How much warmer is it in Auckland?
Discussion about writing learners’ answers using mathematical statements like  240C - -20C

Find at least 1 other Google image to help you understand when we use integers and then explain what an integer is in your own words.
Lesson sequence
Write a mathematical equation for each of the following.
Sela has $7 and finds $4 in her bag. How much does she have altogether?

Tere has 7 lollies and gives 4 away. How many lollies does she have left?

Tui is standing on a strip of blue tape. He takes 4 steps back and 7 steps forward. How many steps is he away from the tape?

Maia is standing in a lift at an entrance to a mine. The lift stops 7m below ground level  to drop off supplies and then makes a final stop 4 m further. At what depth did the lift make its final stop?

                 
7 + 4 = 11               7 - 4 = 3                  -4 + 7 = 3             -7 - 4 = -11

Integers in daily life

Explore learning using online resources

Make learning visible by creating personalised notes documenting evidence of learners’ understanding of Integers
Learning Experiences
Developing a number sense by exploring number in the context of everyday experiences and the world around them.

Using numbers to explore events in their own lives.

Developing mental strategies for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing positive and negative numbers, using a calculator, a variety of models, and other approaches

Solving problems involving positive and negative numbers
Resources
Google images
Google maps
Google document
Teacher’s Google Number  site
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on personalised learners docs and their blogs
Learners blog their learning experience and comment on peers blogs
Next steps
Curriculum
Solving number problems in context
Daily life
Understanding and interpreting everyday number contexts
Reflection
The use of images hooked learners into understanding what integers are and the use thereof; particularly the use of integers in daily life




Number
Number in context
Year 9
Teacher practice
Constructivist
Collaboration
Teacher conferenced with various groups using student knowledge as a guide and answered all questions by probing and encouraging learners to communicate their thinking collaboratively so that they can do critical thinking and show creativity as they learn (4 C’s for today’s learners)
Learning Outcomes
Level 3: Describe a procedure and do calculations with Number problems in context
Level 4: Explain and organise thinking to solve Number problems in context
Level 5: Create and predict solutions and reflect on answers
Success criteria
Learners are successful if they can solve number problems in context

SOLO Taxonomy
Pre structural
Uni
structural
Multi
structural
Relational
Extended abstract
I need help
I can Identify
I can describe a procedure and do calculations with Number problems in context
I can explain and organise my thinking to solve Number problems in context
I can create and predict solutions and reflect on my answers
Do Now (Introduction)
Review images, notes, explanations, examples and challenges on your Number doc
Lesson sequence
Review learning on the Number topic to date
Attempt and solve a contextual task to give learners an indication of their achievement
Trip to Wellington

24 students in 9KLe were planning a trip to Wellington in September with the lovely Mr Mansell. The cost of the trip was $80 per student. The group had a sausage sizzle to raise funds. They needed 8 loaves of bread. Elstree Dairy had bread for $2.20 each, but the owner gave them a 15% discount. Students also bought $50 worth of sausages. Onions and tomato sauce were donated by the Geek Cafe. Students sold 110 sausages for $1.50 each and then had a bake sale a few days later. All baked goods were donated and students made a profit of $250. Mrs Dunn offered to donate ⅕ of the amount raised at the bake sale.  How much would each student have to pay?


Statement
Working
Answer (units)
Total cost of trip
$80 x 24
$1 920
Bread
8 x $2.20
$17.60
Bread discount
15/100 x $17.60
$2.64
Bread cost
$17.60 - $2.64
$14.96 rounded $15
Bread + sausage cost
$15 + $50
$65
Sausage sizzle
$1.50 x 110
$165
Sausage sizzle profit
$165 - $65
$100
Donation
⅕ x $250
$50
Bake sale + s sizzle + donation
$250 + $100 + $50
$400
Total owing
$1920 - $400
$1 520
Payment per student
$1 520 / 24
$63.33 rounded $63.30
shortfall
$1 520 - ($63.30 x 24)
$0.40, so someone will have to pay an extra 40c

Learning Experiences
Apply Number knowledge in real life contexts
Collaborate by discussing ideas and possible solutions
Resources
Google document
Teacher’s Google Number  site
Literacy strategy
Chunking
Sharing learning
Teacher comments on learners blogs
Learners blog their experience and comments on peers blogs
Reflection
Learners completed a survey (Google Form)
Something Old (what learners already knew)
Something New (any new learning or strategies gained during the Number strand)
Something Borrowed (an aspect of Number that learners taught their peers or vice versa)
Something Blue (an aspect of the Number strand that learners still do not fully understand)